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20121231
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 92 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Dec 11, 2012 4:30pm PST
displays? tonight, we look at how one box company is using them to reinvent itself. >> susie: that and more tonight on nbr! >> tom: an agreement to ease the fiscal cliff may not be wrapped up and waiting under your tree for christmas. senate majority leader harry reid said today it would be hard to get an agreement finished by the holiday, blaming the delay on republicans. not surprisingly, republicans say the president hasn't gotten serious about the talks. plenty of outside groups are offering up suggestions. and as darren gersh reports, they include warren buffett and some other big names in finance. >> reporter: there was some public movement in the fiscal cliff standoff today. instead of holding dueling press conferences, republicans and democrats traded barbs on the house floor. >> where are the president's spending cuts? the longer the white house slow- walks this process, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff. >> reporter: behind the scenes, progress is being made, but democrats are still arguing they've given ground in previous budget battles. that's one reason they are h
PBS
Dec 12, 2012 1:00am PST
something new? erika miller takes a closer look at what's expected. >> reporter: the fed may announce a new twist in its bond buying plans, but that doesn't necessarily mean the stock market will shout. at it's final meeting of the year, the central bank is not expected to simply extend its operation twist program. that's the nickname for the fed's strategy of buying long- term treasuries and, at the same time, selling an equal amount of shorter-dated bonds. that's important because it keeps the bank's balance sheet the same size. now, the fed may be ready to do a new stimulus dance. >> under twist, they've been purchasing $45 billion longer term treasuries while at the same time selling $45 billion short term. they've pretty much run out of short-term stuff to sell, so i think they'll be continuing to purchase the long term, but purchasing outright, expanding their balance sheet. >> reporter: and that would be on top of $40 billion a month already committed to buy mortgage-backed securities. some experts worry that $85 billion a month in spending will escalate inflation and,
PBS
Dec 5, 2012 4:30pm PST
." >> susie: big job cuts today at one of the nation's biggest banks. citigroup announced it's slashing 4% of its staff; that works out to 11,000 jobs worldwide. the cuts will save the bank more than $1 billion a year in expenses. but they won't be cheap, resulting in a billion-dollar charge against fourth-quarter earnings. is this gloomy news from citi the beginning of other companies doing the same? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: 11,000 jobs are a lot of layoffs, even for a bank as huge as citi. and there could be more. that's because the monster firm is still struggling to recover from the great recession even though it has fired a lot of other workers in the last few years. the thing is, citi has a new c.e.o. in michael corbat, and experts say he's anxious to make his mark, even if that includes cutting staff. and the need to slim down is not ique to citi; it's indtry- wide. a financial industry runs into huge problems. it happened in the '30s, and it happened in the last five years. when you go through these periods, you go through a lot of change. that industry is now trying to
PBS
Dec 27, 2012 4:30pm PST
though there is no solution ready for lawmakers when they return. and in the senate, which is back at work, republican leader mitch mcconnell warned he would not write a blank check to the white house, though he said he would keep an open mind on anything the president proposes. >> it appears to me the action, if there is any, is now in the senate side and we'll just have to see if we're able, on a bipartisan basis to move forward. >> reporter: senate majority leader harry reid said he too would try to reach agreement. but that was after spending most of the day hammering away at house republicans. reid blamed the current stand off on the inability of house republicans to pass their own plan which would have extended tax breaks for everyone making less than a million dollars a year. >> it's the mother of all debacles. that was brought up in an effort to send us something. he couldn't even pass it among the republicans it was so absurd. he meaning the speaker. so it's very clear now mr. president that the speaker's number one goal is to get elected speaker on january 3. >> reporter: ja
PBS
Dec 13, 2012 6:30pm PST
: and new rules for health care also are around the corner. tonight, we look at how small businesses are preparing for the changes. >> susie: that and more tonight on nbr! >> tom: there's no deal, but the two sides are still talking. house speaker john boehner and president obama met earlier this evening at the white house in an effort to move forward the stalled fiscal cliff talks. there are now just 18 days before the tax hikes and spending cuts that make up the cliff take effect, and today, there were few signs of progress. as darren gersh reports, the tone of the talks, if anything, is getting worse. >> reporter: house democratic leader nancy pelosi may just have a second career as a stock analyst. her commentary on the markets today was dead on. >> so far, they trust that we would not be so stupid as to go over a cliff. >> reporter: but pelosi made clear what everyone knows-- time is running out to reach a deal by christmas >> we really have to come to some agreement in the next couple of days or the very beginning of next week for us to have engineered our way to a solution. >>
PBS
Dec 10, 2012 7:00pm PST
cliff. speaking to union workers at the daimler detroit diesel engine plant, the president said he is willing to compromise "a little bit" with republicans on getting a plan for economic growth, job creation, and reducing the deficit. but he said he would not compromise on raising tax rates for high-income earners. >> and that's a principle i won't compromise on because i'm not going to have a situation where the wealthiest among us, including folks like me, get to keep all our tax breaks, and then we're asking students to pay higher student loans, or suddenly, a school doesn't have school books because the school district couldn't afford it. >> susie: meanwhile, a ranking democrat on the house budget committee tells "nightly business report" he is optimistic about getting a fiscal cliff deal by the end of they year. maryland congressman chris van hollen talked with our darren gersh, and began with an update on the status of the talks. >> well, the good news is that the president and the speaker of the house are now in face-to-face discussions. it's always better to be talking than no
PBS
Dec 29, 2012 1:00am PST
are better off with a bad deal than no deal at all? >> you know susie when peopletal they are talking about a bad deal in political terms. frankly it's republicans that are most worried about the bad deal they have most leverage. the president has the most leverage. they are worried about a bad deal. any deal that gets us past the fiscal cliff is going to be seen as a good deal. >> susie: it seems like we are further apart than last week when president obama gave the last minute pep talk to get the talks going. do we have to reach some point of pain in washington, d.c. that people get mos motivated to geta deal. how does it work in washington? >> i wish i knew.it seems that n ratcratcheting up the pain. i was surprised. i thought enough after the election would be sorted out and the fiscal cliff would be a painful enough deadline they would come together. but it seems like the pain will come when we get to the dead cliff where they must absolutely deal with. it's one area where they must focus attention and create another deadline where they have to do something and potentiall
WETA
Dec 31, 2012 6:30pm EST
sequester-- $110 billion in automatic spending cuts in defense and domestic programs that begin at midnight. democrats want to postpone the cuts for a year or more. republicans for just a few months. >> i think there are some republicans who believe there is no other trigger that will force another full scale debate on spending. >> the president says taxincrea. cutting spenting next year. >> iif they think that is thefos thing they have another think coming. that is not how it's going to work. we have to do this in a balanced and responsible way. and if we are serious about debt reduction then it's going to be a matter of shared sacrifice. that outraged republicans that accused the republicans from moving the goalpost. >> the revenue that has beencams being used not to reduce deficit but to keep spending cogs that s that have been agreed to from not happening. >> suessy it looks like a source negotiating right now to come up with a to 20 to 30 billion three need to move it back to two to three months and that seems to be going well. talk us through the steps over the next couple of
PBS
Dec 4, 2012 4:30pm PST
weeks left, the two sides are still at odds with their opening offers. th time ticking away to reach a deal before tax cuts expire and spending cuts hit, president obama today said he's still optimistic a deal will be done and he's willing to compromise, but negotiations just aren't there yet. >> it's going to require what i talked about in the campaign, which is a balanced, responsible approach to deficit reduction that can help give businesses certainty and make sure the country grows. >> tom: the president rejected the proposal republicans presented him yesterday. it would cut the debt by $2.2 trillion over ten years, but would not raise taxes on america's highest earners, the biggest sticking point. the two sides seem to be allowing themselves room to bargain. the president said today he'd be open to lowering tax rates for high earners later next year as part of a broad tax reform package. and senate republican leader mitch mcconnell did not directly endorse the g.o.p. plan. for now, house speaker boehner put the ball in the president's court, releasing a statement: "the president
PBS
Dec 1, 2012 1:00am PST
speaker characterized the negotiations to avoid huge tax increases and spending cuts at a stalemate. the race to solve the fiscal cliff triggered another round of dramatic sound bites from republicans and president obama. darren gersh has the latest. >> reporter: the president is still pushing to wrap up a deal on the fiscal cliff before christmas and just in case anyone missed that point, he visited a toy factory to urge congress to avoid raising taxes on the middle class. >> that's sort of like the lump of coal you get for christmas. that's a scrooge christmas. a typical middle-class family of four would see their income taxes go up by about $2,200. >> reporter: the president is proposing to raise taxes by $1.6 trillion, while cutting spending by $400 billion. on top of that, mr. obama asked for $50 billion more for infrastructure spending and $140 billion to extend unemployment insurance benefits and the payroll tax cut. republicans literally laughed it off. >> they want... they want to have this extra spending that's actually greater than the amount they're willing to cut. i mea
PBS
Dec 26, 2012 6:30pm PST
at the weakness this holiday season, how much of the blame do you put on retailers for not having inspiring merchandise and how much of it are just factors beyond their control like the economy and the fiscal cliff? >> i think overall it was more probably 70 to 80% factors beyond the retailer's control. i think retailers had creative merchandise but i think the news didn't lead to a feel good factor. >> in any economy, good or bad, you always have some winners. who did really well this year? >> well, it looks like in terms of who did well so far, companies like american eagle outfitters limited, michael cors, macy's' tj and i would say costco was also a winner. >> on the flip side were there retailers that you had high hopes for going into the season but just didn't deliver in the end. >> certainly we will see some becoming more promotion al, some of the children's retailers, whether it was impacted by weather or there was competitive price and they did a good job at it, the children's retailers seemed to have a tougher season this year. >> now is the time of year when we shift in
WETA
Dec 17, 2012 6:30pm EST
opportunity to step and at least put a little bit of sideline money that our clients have and they have a lot to work. >> reporter: wren has no hesitation recommending his clients use any dip as a buying opportunity. that's because he's confident there will be a deal on the fiscal cliff in janaury. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: from grandma's cookies to holiday gifts for the little ones, still ahead we're riding along with u.p.s. as the shipping giant kicks off its busiest week of the year. >> tom: two mildly encouraging words were used by a group of economists to describe what next year may bring: stable and moderate. that's the 2013 outlook from the national association of business economics. the organization figures the u.s. economy will grow 2.1%, driven by housing and construction, but with corporati profit growth slowing down. nayantara hensel is the chairman of the national association for business economics. not bad, moderate, stable but certainly not robust here s it? >> no, that's absolutely right, tom. basically again we're forecasting annual average real gdp g
PBS
Dec 14, 2012 6:30pm PST
, cheapers gasoline and the prices could keep falling, they could at all below $3 a gallon in the new year. >> and why a new program to hell student loan borrowers could be a big win for high earners with graduate degrees. >> that and more tonight on nbr. >> we begin the friday broadcast with the count down to for christmas and the retailers. >> so far this holiday shopping season is really looking rather ho-hum. >> there is still plenty of time to give retailers and their investors a green season, but it is not clear shoppers will turn into buyers in time. susan pratt reports. >> it doesn't >> reporter: it doesn't get more festive than this. or this. or even this. but, just because we've decked the halls, doesn't mean we're hitting the malls. in fact, it looks like u.s. consumers are doing what they do best in mid-decmber: procrastinating. how are you doing on your holiday shopping? >> pretty poorly to be honest with you. my wife typically takes care of most of it. last year, i was definitely ahead of the game. i'm probably 75% to 80% done. fantastic. haven't started yet. hoping to get a
PBS
Dec 21, 2012 4:30pm PST
happen at the national level as well. >> so i think the tax issue and the job issue needs to be looked at together and it shouldn't be divided among rich or middle class, or lower class it shouldn't be any class, it should be america coming together and right now in our house that's a big cause of debate. >> reporter: but washington isn't a source of optimism these days. >> if they make a deal it certainly won't be a good one, they'll say this is something we've got to get done and i don't think it's going to be using any brain power to do it. >> reporr: aeadyhere is growing talk in washington of a so-called mini-deal. >> let's hope they do. the president was serious. he was friendly in the statement he made-- >> he's going on vacation. he's going to hawaii. >> susan: yeah, but there's an urgency here, and do you think we are going to be any closer to getting a deal done? >> the president really scaled back his ambitio for the immediate time. he said, look, guys, nancy pelosi, come back, try to do the minimum, try to do the least amount of harm. and then come up with some way to say that
PBS
Dec 20, 2012 7:00pm PST
that would reshape wall street. it's an $8.2 billion deal that values the n.y.s.e. at $33 a share, a 38% premium to wednesday's close. so what are the implications of an upstart exchange buying the venerable big board? erika miller reports. >> reporter: the new york stock exchange has been the symbol of capitalism for nearly two centuries, but now it wants to give up its independence and be bought by a little-known rival in atlanta. the intercontinental exchange, or "ice" for short, was started 12 years ago as an energy trading platform. since then, the exchange has evolved into an internet-based marketplace trading futures, options, and derivatives. the reason it wants to buy the n.y.s.e. is not the plain vanilla stock trading business. the jewel in the deal is a division called "liffe," a leading futures and options exchange. it's based in london and drives over 40% of n.y.s.e. profits. >> it has a business that deals, for instance, in financial derivatives. these are derivatives contracts tied to financial products like interest rates, and ice has been wanting to expand in that di
PBS
Dec 7, 2012 6:30pm PST
surprises in the report were good. at 7.7%, the unemployment rate hit its lowest level since december 2008. but that was mostly due to people giving up their search for work. and there's another disappointing trend, weak wage growth. >> what we are not seeing is strong income generation. the slowing in wage gains-- the weak bargaining power of labor comes across in this report and >> reporter: so although the labor market is not getting worse, it's not getting a lot better, either. and there are plenty of risks that could cause businesses to cancel projects, and hiring plans. >> clearly one of the biggest risks is that we don't see a deal on the fiscal cliff, or that they drag it out over a number of months. and that that really erodes confidence. >> reporter: against that backdrop, the federal reserve is trying to do all it can to help the economy. the central bank is widely expected to announce an extension of its bond buying program when it meets next week. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: with the fiscal cliff about three weeks away, washington hasn't made much p
WETA
Dec 6, 2012 6:30pm EST
after is unprecedented powers to spend taxpayer dollars without any limit at all. >> reporter: if the debt limit isn't raised, the country can't pay for the spending congress has already approved. and economists say the nation pays a high price for this kind of brinksmanship. >> business people aren't going to engage unless they have clarity with respect to this thing. >> reporter: but few insiders expect to find much clarity from washington in the coming weeks. darren gersh, nbr, washington. >> susie: investors will be searching for more clarity on those fiscal cliff talks, and they will also be studying tomorrow's importa")jé:0@6cj& but josh feinman says the november numbers won't give an accurate picture of the labor market. he's chief economist at d.b. advisors. >> reporter: hi, josh, so you're talking about distortions in that report. tell us more. >> yes, hi, susie. i think that the hurricane sandy may distort the numbers. we've seen it in some of the other high frequency data in the last couple of weeks. keep in mind tomorrow's labor market report will report on a snapshot
PBS
Dec 4, 2012 1:00am PST
. he's managing director and chief investment strategist at raymond james. so jeff, not only are you bullish but you're also calling for a pretty decent santa claus rally. tell us why? >> well, i have learned over the 42 years in this business, susie, that it's pretty tough to put stocks to the downside in the ebullient month of december. i mean it's happened but it's a pretty rare event it just seems to be the holiday sentiment tend to its lift stocks. i think that is what will happen this kror because i'm not one that thinks we'll fall totally off the cliff. >> tell us more. you think there is going to be some kind of deal by the end of the year and that is a good thing for the stock market? >> i am not sure that you will get a whole resolution to the deal but i think will you see some kind of scaled in event of the of the 265 billion of bush tax cuts only 55 billion go to the wealthy. the other 210 billion go to the middle classment i don't think president obama wants to take that away. i can see him taking it away from the wealthy folks. but not the middle class. also, if you rea
PBS
Dec 19, 2012 1:00am PST
tax rates or at least allowing tax rates to go back where they were in the clinton years for high income people. that is quite progressive. this makes it just slightly less progressive, but on balance it's not a bad package. >> reporter: but those tax rate increases are getting smaller. the white house now says it will accept a top rate on income over $400,000. republicans are sticking with a $1 million and up. >> so now you are talking about a subset of what is already a pretty small group of taxpayers. so you're talking about a few hundred thousand taxpayers, probably one way or the other. >> reporter: as the two sides get closer, conservatives are getting nervous. they say lawmakers often promise to cut spending but then back out later. as proof, they argue congress and the president are already using disasters and war spending as loopholes to avoid making tough cuts. >> they are doing that on the one side, then proposing additional stimulus spending on the other side, and then claiming that sometime next year they'll come up with some savings. that's a very troubling formula t
PBS
Dec 25, 2012 6:30pm PST
, persistence, and profitability can you squeeze into a 15-pound block of cheese? at the petaluma creamery in petaluma, california, not quite enough of the last. why did you buy it? >> i wanted to saving a which you are in sonoma county. >> mike: that's a tall order. anybody ever told you you were nuts? >> oh, yes. many a times. >> mike: larry peter bought the 99-year-old petaluma creamery in 2004. it was idle, about to be torn down. a dairyman, peter owns 300 head of jersey milking cows, they roam free on his ranch in two rock, organic to nth degree. a first-generation farmer, peter cobbled together a living from the land, milk, a pumpkin patch in the fall, farmer's markets. but after nearly two decades, he needed to do something to increase revenue. >> i figured if i could cut out the middleman, grow the feed, milk the cow, make the cheese and sell the product to the customer i would be able to help pay my mortgage better. >> mike: so he bought the creamery, bringing in milk for more than 30 dairies in northern california, saving them the transportation cost to creameries three and four hou
PBS
Dec 24, 2012 4:30pm PST
street. and they're a rare breed in corporate america. we look at why so few c.e.o.'s are women. that and more, tonight on nbr. >> susie: not a very merry day of trading on wall street today. it was a holiday shortened session, and the investors and traders working on this half- day were playing it safe, especially with the fiscal cliff talks on holiday break as well. when the closing bell rang at 1:00 eastern time, the dow was down 51 points, the nasdaq lost eight, and the s&p was off 3 points. so while wall street worked half a day, washington was on vacation. lawmakers are increasingly pessimistic about a big agreement-- or any agreement-- being reached before the year ends. darren gersh has the latest. >> reporter: 'twas the night before christmas, and all through the house, nothing much was going on. it was the same story in the senate. washington's cliff talks still remain deadlocked. congress will return on thursday, and it's still possible a few days of holiday cheer and constituent outrage may push republicans and democrats to craft a last-minute agreement to avoid the worst
PBS
Dec 28, 2012 4:30pm PST
. fiscal cliff talks at the white house end with nal, but president obama says he's still hopeful and says "we've got to get this done." gold prices pulled back today on worries about the fiscal cliff, will the metal shine in 2013? then cuba, tonight's "market monitor" sees big opportunity on the tiny island when the embargo's lifted. thomas herzfeld, of thomas herzfled advisors joins us. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! president obama says he's "modestly optimistic" a fiscal deal can be reached in time. he said he's instructed senator harry reid and senator mitch mcconnell to come up with a plan that can pass in congress. his brief comments a short while ago came after a white house meeting today with congressional leaders that ended with no deal. ahead of that, investors lost hope lawmakers can come together in the time remaining. in the last few minutes of trading, stocks sold off. the dow tumbled 158 points, the nasdaq lost 25, and the s&p fell over 15 points. here's darren gersh with more on the critical work that has to get done in washington this weekend. >> port: thpresiden
PBS
Dec 19, 2012 7:00pm PST
.," washington. >> susie: the threat of the fiscal cliff was a big topic at an investor conference in new york today hosted by johnson controls. this wisconsin-based industrial conglomerate is a leading provider of products to make buildings energy efficient, and it's also the world's largest maker of car batteries and automotive seats. c.e.o. stephen roell told me he's worried that uncertainty about the fiscal cliff could hurt consumer confidence, and his business. >> we don't do that. as the consumer, i products to costumers like the big three, that in turn sell to the auto industry. my biggest concern is how it will affect the psychology of the consumer. i've been surprised, susie, that people continue to buy automobiles. but my fear is that could change dramatically. >> susie: steve, to what extent are the ups and downs impacting your business day to day. >> i think people are holding back on making captain investments. i see that particularly in the building side. from my standpoint, i continue to invest around the world. i'll invest to make sure i'm buying the strategies we laid up
PBS
Dec 15, 2012 1:00am PST
friday lull that we've seen in the last three weeks that consumers are spending at a very restrained rate simply because they don't have the money and there's a little bit of a fear factor out there. >> reporter: but, there are those who say it's wrong to credit the fiscal cliff for the lackluster holiday shopping season. more likely they think shoppers are playing a game of chicken with retailers, waiting for more stores to drop prices. if that's true, shoppers may be disappointed. >> will retailers react to the softness we've seen, the typical lull? i don't have a sense that that's happening. but, the industry is very fragmented. >> reporter: tomorrow is considered a crucial holiday shopping day. here in manhattan the forecast calls for sunny skies and cool temperatures. perfect for a little spending. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> well, if you driving to the mall, you are paying a lot less for gas, pump prices are plunging dropping seven and a half percent in november. the national average for gasoline is now $3.30 a gallon. >> and that is the main reason consume
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 92 (some duplicates have been removed)